© Larry Dane Brimner, Trustee, Brimner/Gregg Trust, 2015; Home Page Author Photo Credit: Roxyanne Young
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FOR TEACHERS

Teaching has come a long way 

from the early Twentieth Century, as these Library of Congress primary source documents suggest. At the top, we have a classroom, with teacher, from around 1910 or so. Bottom, African American students gather around the wood stove in a classroom to warm themselves prior to the start of instruction. TEACHING TIP  If you are using primary sources in your class, try introducing them by having your students do a MIND WALK. (From the Library of Congress: http://faculty.washington.edu/jalbano/la bor/mindwalk.html.) Have them record  everything they do during a 24-hour period. Then have them respond to the following  questions: 1. Which of your activities were most likely to leave behind trace evidence? (Trace evidence is something physical that a future researcher might find.) 2. What, if any, evidence might be preserved for the future? Why? 3. What might be left out of an historical record of your activities? Why?  4. What would a future historian be able to tell about your life AND YOUR SOCIETY based on the trace evidence of your activities? 5. What are the benefits/advantages of primary sources? What are their limitations? .
TEACHERS
© Larry Dane Brimner, Trustee, Brimner/Gregg Trust, 2015; Home Page Author Photo Credit: Roxyanne Young
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FOR TEACHERS

Teaching has come a long way 

from the early Twentieth Century, as these Library of Congress primary source documents suggest. At the top, we have a classroom, with teacher, from around 1910 or so. Bottom, African American students gather around the wood stove in a classroom to warm themselves prior to the start of instruction. TEACHING TIP  If you are using primary sources in your class, try introducing them by having your students do a MIND WALK. (From the Library of Congress: http://faculty.washington.edu/jalbano/labor/mindwalk.html.) Have them record  everything they do during a 24-hour period. Then have them respond to the following  questions: 1. Which of your activities were most likely to leave behind trace evidence? (Trace evidence is something physical that a future researcher might find.) 2. What, if any, evidence might be preserved for the future? Why? 3. What might be left out of an historical record of your activities? Why?  4. What would a future historian be able to tell about your life AND YOUR SOCIETY based on the trace evidence of your activities? 5. What are the benefits/advantages of primary sources? What are their limitations? .